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Carers

Who is a carer?
A carer is someone of any age who provides unpaid support to help an adult live at home.  Anyone can become a carer; carers come from all walks of life, all cultures and can be of any age. Many feel they are doing what anyone else would in the same situation and just getting on with it.

  • You could be a relative, friend or neighbour.
  • You don’t have to live with the person.
  • You don't have to be the only person that provides care.
  • You may be caring for more than one person.
  • The person that you care for could be any age, be frail, have a long term physical illness or disability, a learning disability, be deaf or visually impaired or experience mental health or substance misuse problems.
  • The support you provide could be things such as help with practical tasks such as washing, dressing, taking medicines, shopping or laundry, emotional support, help to manage difficult behaviour, ‘Keeping an eye’ on someone to make sure they are safe, keeping someone company or helping them when they go out.

The 2011 Census report has identified that there has been an increase in the number of carers in the last decade by 10,517 across Nottinghamshire. It is important to let your GP surgery know if you are a carer.  Please request a carers’ registration form from your GP surgery.   Staff will record this to make sure your health needs and the circumstances that being a carer presents can be taken into account when accessing services.

What support and information is available to carers?

There is a range of support available to carers from the Nottinghamshire County Council and the NHS.  Further details are available in the factsheet 

Do you look after someone?
As an unpaid carer you are entitled to a carer's assessment in your own right.  An assessment may identify support or information to assist you in your caring duties. The person you care for could also access a community care assessment. 
  
See Nottinghamshire County Council’s young carer’s pages for the support they provide to children and young people under the age of 25 who care for others.

We are working with Nottinghamshire County Council and all Clinical Commissioning Groups in Nottinghamshire to deliver a Joint Carers Strategy and action plan.

 

Carers Information Pack


The fact sheet is aimed at carers explaining what support is available from Nottinghamshire County Council, the NHS  and other local organisations.
Carers Information Pack

A Carer’s Emergency Card is free and identifies you as a carer an emergency situation.   It will alert anyone finding the card that you are a carer and that someone you care for may require assistance.  An online application form is available here.

 

Nottinghamshire Carers Hub                             

Are you, or is someone you know, providing much-needed care for a loved one? Get free access to a range of support and services – right when you need it most.

Carers Trust East Midlands provides timely, personalised information and support via the Nottinghamshire Carers Hub to make caring for a loved one easier.  The scheme is funded by Nottinghamshire County Council and the local NHS.  The Carers Hub can offer:

  • Information, advice and guidance
  • Signposting to other organisations
  • Short break accommodation
  • Access to Carers support groups
  • Free gym memberships
  • Access to Carers breaks
  • Free training and caring support 
  • Carers Smart benefits and discounts
  • Carers grants                                      
  • Peer support

Look after yourself as well as the loved one you care for.  Further information is available here or get in touch today.

Telephone: 0115 824 8824

(lines are open Monday to Friday, 9am until 5pm)

Email: hub@carerstrustem.org

 

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